Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Butterfly! Butterfly!

Celtic Knot Butterfly by Rozella F Linden
Well, I proved I could. I can needle tat passibly. This is the Celtic Knot Butterfly pattern from Rozella F. Linden’s book Celtic Tatting Knots & Patterns published in 2004 by Handy Hands.


We discovered in the Tatting Study Group that there were some errors corrected in my copy. I guess I have a later printing than the other ladies. So, much of time last Tuesday was spent proofing for pattern errors. I must say, that has to be the part of designing I absolutely detest! My eyes start to cross very quickly!


Anyway, I’m not entirely happy with my work on this butterfly. It has nothing to do with the pattern, nor using needle rather than shuttle. I chose the wrong size thread for the outer round of black. It just doesn’t work for the pattern. I may try again; after I work up a square motif that was shared with me at the last Carmel Craft Guild meeting. Thank you Nancy!

10 comments:

  1. I think your butterfly looks really good!! :)
    Much better than the one I tried!

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  2. I've decided to use a larger size thread for the outer round. I'm hoping to fix that this weekend.

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  3. Just look at those lovely Celtic knots in your needle tatting. I hear it is easier to make them with a needle. Do you agree? I've thought about getting one of those Celtic shuttles that is very narrow.

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    1. For this pattern, I found it easier with needle than with my celtic shuttle. I do like the skinny shuttle for some patterns. But for this pattern, I like the needle....except for how the thinner thread made the knots on the bottom "wing" get all scrunched up. Sigh!

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    2. Thank you for the feedback. It sounds like I should still invest in that Celtic shuttle. :)

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  4. But the butterfly flies through !!! Love it.
    Celtic tatting (at least with shuttles) is on my to-tat list for quite a while now ...

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    1. Some patterns are easier than others. Some you tat a motif, tat another, twine them together and lock with a final round. Others are just long chains woven into the knot before joining. Maybe it's time for the Monday class to revisit types of celtic patterns!

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    2. That sounds like a great idea to me, too. I'm sure Georgia would be interested in the suggestion.

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